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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)
as a boy living in a household under a core corrupt dictator, president suharto. if you look at obama's first memoir there is quite searing accounts of his stepfather talking to him about this being a land of cruelty where weak people are killed by strong people. and you can konl imagine the young obama listening to this. >> rose: finally this evening we go from he lipt-- egypt to the american economy with austan goolsbee. we close this evening by looking ahead at sunday's super bowl with boomer. max rodenbeck, david ignatius, miguele dunne, austan goolsbee when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: to have more exposure to the arts. maybe you want to provide meals for the needy. or maybe you want to help when the unexpected happens. whatever you want to do, members project from american express can help you take the first step. vote, volunteer, or donate for the causes you believe in at membersproject.com. take charge of making a difference. additional funding provided by these funders: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new
overtake them. in fact one u.s. official said it's been a real crawl, walk, run toward the obama administration trying to catch up with events. >> charlie: we conclude with bill keillor executive editor of "the new york times" talking about wikileaks and events in egypt. >> it's has some immediate impact and to the extent that what's happening in the streets of egypt, many of the egyptians say they were inspired by what happened in tunisia and had a second -- secondary effect. >> charlie: our conversation with annette benning will be shown next week. wikileaks, next. maybe you want school kids to have more exposure to the arts. maybe you want to provide meals for the needy. or maybe you want to help when the unexpected happens. whatever you want to do, members project from american express can help you take the first step. vote, volunteer, or donate for the causes you believe in at membersproject.com. take charge of making a difference. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: in egypt today there was a d
of president hosni mubarak. the obama administration has been struggling to keep pace with the rapidly changing events. secretary of state hillary clinton told a european security conference on saturday those of us who are trying to make helpful offers of assistance and suggestions for how to proceed are still at the end on the outside looking in. joining me now by phone from cairo is "new york times" columnist in roger cohen. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so tell me where we are at this monday late night in cairo. >> well, today the government, president hosni mubarak, seemed to be reasserting control, at least to some degree. cairo had an air of greater normalcy. there was more traffic, banks open at least for a couple of hours and the government immediately put through a 15% pay rise, the government workers, in an attempt to calm things. but the protests atta rear square continue with many, many thousands of people still in the square and the standoff remains. the protestors who insist that hosni mubarak, president of 30 years, must go now and mubarak seemingly increasingly supported by we
and see if it holds is the coalition between the clintons and president obama. that is to me the key political fact in the country, that coalition. if that weren't there, hillary clinton f she were still senator of this state up in new york would be the lightning rod for every middle east problem, every economic problem. she would be the way ted kennedy was back with jimmy carter. the party would be split. and the fact that it is not split i think is key to its success, and its possibility of winning a significant re-election. if they weren't united as they are, i don't think they would be winning next time. >> rose: do you think if she was in the senate now. >> the things that have happened she might be positions herself to challenge. >> not to challenge but even if she didn't, she would be positioned to inevitably play the role of critic because it would just come to her it would be the automatic role for somebody like that. and as it is, because she's part of the team and done this perfect job so far, bill clinton's part of the team, it's really that, i don't know if i said this b
of the things that's made this so fascinating is that while president obama has faced foreign policy changes before, afghanistan, north korea, this is the first one that is coming at this whitehouse in real time. where they're having to adjust their rhetoric and positions to events they really can't control. they're missing a whole lot of leverage. what i find most fascinating in my most recent conversations with whitehouse officials who are dealing with this, is that they now recognize that the american aid to egypt which is $1.5 a year isn't much leverage. much is in military equipment and most of the jobs back here. their real leverage at this point is the fact that the protesters still keep coming out in the street including today at the beginning of the rolling strikes around the country. and so now the obama administration finds itself in the odd position that in order to get to that stability that they cherish and to get to the elections that they need to have and the constitutional reforms, they really need the protesters to stay out on the street. they need to foment a good deal of
of tripoli. the obama administration has condemned the government's use of lethal force. earlier today, the deputy ambassador of libya's mission to the united nations renounced colonel qaddafi calling on them to step down and leave the country. joining me now are professor dirk vandewalle of dartmouth college and barbara plett of the british broadcasting corporation. professor, let me go to you first, tell me where you think things are at 5:00 p.m. on monday. >> i think at this point we are at kind of a crucial phase. it seems the demonstrations have started to take place in tripoli and tripoli in many ways is in a sense the big prize. green square in tripoli is really the symbol of qaddafi's revolution. it's where he holds his annual parades. it's where three days ago he still walked around to prove thaefs still in charge. and my hunch is that if indeed these demonstrations continue, particularly around green square but extend beyond tripoli as well and that the kind of fighting we've seen continues, that this may very well be the crucial 48 hours ahead of us that will decide whether
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)

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